Skip to main content

About your Search

20121121
20121129
STATION
CSPAN2 6
CNBC 5
CSPAN 5
MSNBCW 2
CNNW 1
KTVU (FOX) 1
LANGUAGE
English 21
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)
traffic on 880. also slow traffic getting out to 92. >> let's go to steve. >>> well, santa rosa says mostly cloudy. although ukiah says light rain and all the way down to santa rosa -- san jose. so there's still some in there but the main core of the system is pushing east and south. it is weakening. but there's decent totals. oakland hills, 1.5. emeryville, 1.04. the city 1.25. there were heavier amounts towards -- der row. rodeo -- cazadero, rodeo 2.83. sfo and hayward, both about 45/100ths. kind of winding down. but still kind of misty, drizzly, cloudy, fog being reported. santa rosa says fog. light showers up in marin county south over towards the east bay. again, most of the heavier stuff looks like it is out of the peninsula and starting to head down more towards san jose, santa clara and even that looks weaker now. there's been reports of moderate rain towards san jose. you can see down towards morgan hill some rain and scotts valley. we're not down with the cloud cover. it will be a cloudy to mostly cloudy day. but high pressure showing signs of building in later today and to
-eakin and aol co-founder steve case, at the aspen institute for 30 minutes. >> next we have a panel on america and where it is going, steve clemens -- steve clemons is the empress area of washington ideas. >> hey, folks. everybody is running to the thompson reuters counter. thank you for joining us. great to be with you. i am steve -- steve clemons, editor of large of the atlantic, i want to compliment the museum and tell you how historic this is. this is a jam packed day. the google party is coming up, this is one of three times in the history of the museum that they have allowed an outside group, the other happened to be the president of the united states and madeleine albright when she was secretary of state, this is the third time for a during the day session here, this is a great partnership. i think the -- i have a friend here, allen was the founder of circuit city, just apparently wrote the rise and fall of circuit city and to some degree they are uncomfortable truths, when you think of nations and companies, there are rise and fall stories and the united states is so clean not on the f
, and the neweum talking about economic competitiveness hearing from steve case and douglas holtz-eakin. this is 30 minutes. >> next, we have a panel on america and where it's going driving the panel will be steve clemons of washington ideas. steve? >> thank you. >> hey, folks. everybody's running to the thompson counter. thank you, all, for joining us. great to be with you. i'm steve clemons, editor at large of "the atlantic," and i want to tell you how historic it is. it's a jam packedded day, the google party's coming up, david brummonds, one of three times in the history of the newseum they allowed an outside group like the president of the united states, and mad lin albright to do a teleconference. this is the first time they opened it up for a during the day session here. it's a great partnership, and i thank the newseum for doing this. i have a friend here somewhere, allen, the founder of circuit city, apparently wrote a book called "the rise and fall of circuit city," and to some degree, there's uncomfortable truths when you think about nations and companies, there's rise and fall stories r
and republican strategist steve smith. that's and university of delaware and starts at 8 p.m. eastern. here on c-span2, author mark friedman talks about how more baby boomers are entering into a second careers. he's the author of the big shi shift. that's also at 8 p.m. eastern. >> ahead of the federal communications commission, julius genachowski, spoke yesterday about international telecommunications policy. chairman genachowski's remarks are about one hour. >> good afternoon. thanks for joining the conversation with fcc chairman genachowski. just some quick introductory marks, sort of normal rules of the game them sure you are all familiar with. welcome to our meeting today at the council on foreign relations. plump lately turn off your cell phones, blackberries and all wireless devices to avoid intervention with the sound system and as a reminder, this meeting is on the record. i'm very excited to be here today, this perhaps the most anticipated cfr event as much as the new james bond movie, since we rescheduled a number times but i'm glad that chairman to join us today. just a quick introdu
in congressman steve israel, a democrat from new york, and chair of the democratic congressional campaign committee. congressman, good morning. >> good morning, chris. >> u.n. representative cole sent a letter to president morsi asking him to refrain from giving hamas cover to intensify its attacks by allowing egyptian delegations to visit gaza. of course, morsi has been a major player in these truce negotiations. do you think he's sending a mixed message? >> well, he is sending a mixed message. you know, i hope that president morsi is able to play a constructive role. but when high-level delegations of egyptians go into gaza under the pretense of a cease-fire and then terrorist groups violate that cease fire, if israel were to defend itself and members of the delegation was tragically hurt in that attack, we do not want that to be used as a pretense to violate the egyptian/israeli peace treaty. one other thing on this, chris. look, there's a fundamental truth here. i was on the border of gaza and israel in august of 2005 when israel unilaterally and without any preconditions left gaza. a
i'm steve kroft. thanks for joining us. [ticking] [ticking] >> it is the mark of the yakuza: ornate, full-body tattoos that cover the members of the japanese mob. so how did one of their most notorious godfathers get into america and jump to the front of a line for a lifesaving liver transplant? this reporter found out and says it may cost him his life. >> as he was leaving and getting in his car, he said, "that"-- you know, "that--that goddamn american jew reporter. i want to kill him." [ticking] >> greg mortenson's book three cups of tea is a publishing phenomenon that has made him a celebrity, a cult-like figure on the lecture circuit, and inspired people to give nearly $60 million to his charity, and it all began with one simple story. >> it's a beautiful story, and it's a lie. >> we wanted to talk to mortenson about that and some other things, but he didn't want to talk to 60 minutes. >> steve kroft. >> nice to meet you. >> how you doing? >> thanks. >> got five minutes for us today? >> um... [ticking] >> we wondered how the man who could whistle up a corporate jet on a whim...
didn't want to talk to 60 minutes. >> steve kroft. >> nice to meet you. >> how you doing? >> thanks. >> got five minutes for us today? >> um... [ticking] >> we wondered how the man who could whistle up a corporate jet on a whim... >> let's rock. >> or throw a $2 million birthday party was doing in his reduced circumstances. what's it like to go from king of the world to prisoner number 05a-4820 serving 8 to 25 years behind bars? >> in my wildest imagination, when i would project myself into my late 50s and early 60s, where i would be or what i would be doing, if i make a list of 100 different places or 100 different things, here would never make that list. >> welcome to 60 minutes on cnbc. i'm morley safer. in this edition, we look at stories of crime, punishment, and what money can buy. first, the high-stakes world of japanese organized crime, where big dollars saved the life of an infamous gangster. then we investigate how best-selling author and philanthropist greg mortenson used some of the assets of his multimillion-dollar charity. and finally, we talk to dennis kozlowski, the
and the museum. up next, economists talk about u.s. economic competitiveness. aol co-founder steve case and former congressional budget office director douglas holtz-eakin. this is 30 minutes. >> next we have a panel on america and where it is going, driving the panel will be steve clemons, the impresario of washington ideas. >> thank you. hey, folks. everybody is running to the thompson riders counter. thank you all for joining us. it's great to be with you. i'm steve clemons, washington editor at large of the atlantic. i want to complement the museum and tell you how historic this is. i know this is a jam packed date. the party is coming up. this is one of three times in the history of the museum that they have allowed an outside group, the other happened to be the president of the united states and onetime madeleine albright when she was secretary of state or something coming in to do a teleconference. this is the third time they've opened up and in byrd for i during the day session, so this is a really great partnership. i wanted thank you for doing this. what we are going to do now
.a.c. management and it's unclear whether steve cohen himself will be on the call will be briefing investors of what's going on of late, notably this case filed last week. and this case is important because for the first time it would appear that steve cohen the fund founder has implicated himself in one of the trades involved, although we don't know what knowledge he had and whether he knew that martoma alleged improper information. having said all that, it's unclear what s.a.c. is facing in terms of investor redemptions. i reported last week on one money manager who under pressure from individual investors in its fund were redeeming capital. now, the next window to take capital back is actually not until early 2013, but that party filed a bit early. as of yet i was hearing there are other individual investors who are in s.a.c. either through funds of funds or in this case through private brokers who are feeling very uncomfortable about it. and they are almost looking at s.a.c. as a stock that could go to zero if these legal issues get serious enough. now, their advisers, money managers are
to hand over to the dominical steve clemons, who is moderating the session. >> thank you so much. it's great to be with all of you. we have a fantastic panel. we have kazuyuki yamazaki, part of japan's ministry of foreign affairs and we have the undersecretary of defense for policy, jim miller, and then we have the editorial director of india today, and a very big star blasters program, i enjoyed our encounter last year and expects similar feistiness, m.j. akbar. finally, we have paul madison, who is commander of the navy. thank you for joining us. when i was thinking about the title today and thinking about our panel, it occurred to me and i went online to find a chinese event is being held right now. there are no canadians, japanese, americans, on this panel. we don't have any chinese today, but we should have a lot of fun discussing strategy in asia pacific region with china, but i also want to acknowledge that that voice may not be with us today, but that could be giving us room to run. i went to china and visited with the ministry of foreign affairs and i met with their director
extraordinary. joining us is head of voice of customer analytics team. steve, thanks for joining us. it's a surprising discovery. where have you done the survey and how have you found out this is the case? >> we have done it across several countries across 7,000 respondees and we're finding that it's quite shock to go some people i think that price would automatically be seen as being the most competeitivcompetitive. service is more of the marketing proposition that companies should be going with rather than just putting everything around price. because service is a very eknow difference subject. >> is this equally across online and in the shop? >> it's across all channels. and this is where we're finding a lot of companies are -- >> so it isn't a point about going online. actually price is the whole point about online. >> i think where companies are missing the service is looking at the voice of the customer experience. so a lot of people might be focusing online and on price or they might be seeing online as more of a complaints channel. >> just trying to think about what is service c
saying leave us alone. essentially. the california voters have already spoken. today steve cohen friend of our show, democrat from tennessee, the first district there said this in "the washington post" in an op eth. we ask that your departments take no enforcement action against anyone who acts in compliance with the laws of colorado, washington and any other states that choose to regulate access to marijuana for medicinal or personal use. it is not just the elected officials or the liberals. you have people who were in law enforcement, law enforcement against prohibition. this is the leap letter. after 40 years of the drug war people no longer look upon law enforcement as heroes but as people to be feared. this is particularly true in poor neighborhoods and those people of color and -- and those of people of color and it impacts our ability to fight real crime. i'm joined with michael tricia, ana and we invite a criminal defense. sara, what happens? how does this work if there's a federal -- one federal law but t
communicate with strategic a fact. i think you touched, steve, on an important piece which is the superiority conflicts, if i can put it that way. china fell to they were abused by major powers through the 19th century and well into the 20th century. that has an interesting counterbalance, which as they seem to have a bit of a superiority complex about the solutions they are building about how china emerges as a global power. this containment peace is a bit of a challenge. the entire challenge their -- the chinese are making claims with respect to the sea are fairly outrageous. what they're looking for at the end of the day, i think, is respect -- respect at the table and for who they are and what they're doing. somehow we need to find the means to bring these two solitudes together. at the end of the day, any conflict, whether it is kinetic or otherwise, that affects the flow of trade through that part of the world will have an impact globally. >> it is doing it now with china and japan. you have to of the biggest economies in the world in a nightmare situation that raises the fundamental qu
announcer ] this is steve. he loves risk. but whether he's climbing everest, scuba diving the great barrier reef with sharks, or jumping into the market, he goes with people he trusts, which is why he trades with a company that doesn't nickel and dime him with hidden fees. so he can worry about other things, like what the market is doing and being ready, no matter what happens, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. i honestly loved smoking, and i honestly didn't think i would ever quit. [ male announcer ] along with support, chantix is proven to help people quit smoking. it reduces the urge to smoke. it put me at ease that you could smoke on the first week. [ male announcer ] some people had changes in behavior, thinking or mood, hostility, agitation, depressed mood and suicidal thoughts or actions while taking or after stopping chantix. if you notice any of these stop taking chantix and call your doctor right away. tell your doctor about any history of depression or other mental health problems, which could get worse while taking chantix. don't take chanti
are getting your reaction this morning. steve is from pendleton, indiana, on our independent line. thanks for calling. caller: thanks for taking my call. doing asking what we're to prepare for the fiscal cliff. the main question is people need to be completely ready. [indiscernible] there's no one coming to save you. this government is completely the fault. it's not going to work itself out. ben bernanke cannot do anything to help us. they continue to print money, which takes more money out of your pocket, which makes you work harder so you cannot pay attention to what they are doing. i recommend everybody pay attention to what you are doing. host: i appreciate the call this morning. a few more those scenarios from the wall street journal graphics in today's paper that you can check out on page a6. they look also entire income professionals and what would happen if the burdens of the fiscal cliff -- how sharply the different groups would be affected. we will go to denver, colorado, of the democratic line. ena is waiting to chat with us. caller: good morning. what i am doing to prepare for
will be steve collins, the impresario of washington ideas. >> a thank you. >> thank you all for joining us. armed washington editor at large at "the atlantic." howant to chtell you amazing this is. this is one of three times that they have allowed an outside group, the other happening to be president of the united states and onetime madeleine albright coming in to do with teleconference. this is the third time they have opened this upper for a during the day session. this is a great partnership and i want to think the museum for doing this. i have got a friend hear some more. he was the founder of circuit city and he has just written a book called the rise and fall of circuit city. to some degree, they are uncomfortable truth is when you think about nations, companies. of there certainly rise and fall stories. political campaigns are really lousy times to think about the hard truth of what is happening. one of the hard truth about our panel is that we are five white guys. we try to figure out how to divvy this up. we're four tall guys and dog. we are very aware of this. for all of you to e
education network. building on steve's question, it strikes me that it doesn't necessarily need to be a federal role in promulgating standards, that these can be voluntary standards, for local education funds, this was a voluntary adoption profit says -- adoption process based on the standard of good conduct and their management. but there is a critique of year in the for-profit world historically that i wonder if it is standard -- that i wonder if standards or another mechanism can address. in the charter world where you have an independent chartering authority that grants a charter to a for-profit school but takes it out from under the public '. this school board, the elected officials does not have a -- does not have the ability to pour -- to pull the charter. perhaps there will be an analogous critique. i wonder if standards or other mechanism is a way to address that critique? you talk about accountability in terms outcome measures and so on, but the broader critique about governance, i wonder about that. >> i think the governor and its -- i think the government's question
thrilled. steve israel, the chairman of the dccc put out a fund-raising e-mail saying that paul ryan. they planned -- >> however good you think that is, it didn't work. what did he -- >> let me address that. he actually won the seniors vote. i think he has opened up the possibility both for president obama and congressional republicans, and you saw this in this poll that came out, center left organization, talking about people are open on entitlement reform in a way they haven't been in the past and i think romney/ryan broke through a little bit on that. other policy areas. look, republicans have to do a better job over the next couple years, particularly the republican think tank community, has to do a better job of thinking through about how to talk about middle class economics and go into the r and d business. i'm a supply sider, i'm as much of a believer in, you know, pro growth supply side economics as anybody, but the anchor for every one of our debates about our economic future, cannot simply be about marginal tax rates as much as i support keeping marginal tax rates low. we h
, creative artists agency foundation, entrepreneur steve portman he ran for gubernatorial nomination a couple of years ago. and it's focused on providing a new kind of education on the ipad for boomers and particularly focused on careers that have social impact. they believe are going to launch in september. i can tell you whether they will succeed or not but i was struck by the fact that this was a significant investment that was made and it was a collaboration between public and private institutions, a development that i'm much closer to and that i mentioned earlier is the film -- [inaudible] we were in partnership with one of the producers of that sound and in fact we have been doing a contest called the marigold ideas in which people over 50 in communities around the country each month get 5000-dollar prices for an idea for social change in their community. one person each month gets to go with the rose color -- rhodes scholar. they're still a couple of months left in the contest so i encourage anybody to enter. it was a film that was made for $10 million it was made upwards of $125 milli
, of which i have been privileged to be a leader with steve smith in new jersey, having a press conference with dr. j. because we found that using blood cord stem cells had been applied to some people with success, including, i believe, some in this nation who suffer from sickle cell anemia. forgetting totally about adult stem cell the -- stem cells, the week the nobel prize committee announced the prize to the two sign tiffses who had unlocked the key in the ability to take adult stem cells and reprogram them back to induced pleni potent cells meaning they had the ability to become like embryonic cells. and just weeks before they had cured a disease in dogs using cells from the dog's nasal passages. there can be a legitimate debate about the moral and ethical concerns surrounding stem cell research and embryonic stem cell research but to have an ad that reduces it to the question of whether a 5-year-old can look in the camera and say, why does this congressman want me to die? how does that elevate the debate? how does that in any way enhance our ability to make very difficult decisions? d
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)